AP Trip: Metropolitan Museum of Art

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April 13, 2017 by mrcaseyhistory

Student Tour Guide Presentations

For our trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 2nd, each student must research on of the following pieces and prepare a three to five minute presentation on the piece to give to the rest of the class. Essentially, you will be acting as a tour guide, with an expertise on the piece you are discussing. It does not need to be overly formal or scripted, but it should be well-prepared and detailed. While you will be graded on your presentation rather than on a written assignment, you are welcome to turn in your notes as additional evidence. I have provided a variety of links to video and text resources further below. Clicking on the name of the piece will take you to the catalog page for the piece on the Met website.

For your presentation, you will need to discuss each of the following in your presentations…

Subject Explanation: What is being depicted or represented in this piece? Simply put; what are we looking at?

Historical Context: When and where was this made? What purpose did it serve? What is the larger cultural world within which this piece was created, and how does that help us gain a deeper understanding of and appreciation for the piece?

Artistic Analysis: What should we note about how the piece was created? What significant features does it have? Is there anything noteworthy about the history of the piece itself? You can mention any other important information here.

 

Depending on the piece, you may find you want to spend more time on one category than another, depending on what is most relevant, but be sure to touch on all three. Also, for some of the pieces, I gave specific notes below, so make sure to consider those as well.

Presentation Assignments

Since each student must present on a different piece, I have to assign a piece to you. While I will try to honor your preferences, I cannot make any guarantees. Please email me directly with your first, second, and third choices from the list below and I will post the final list below when available.

Media Consent Forms

Even if you have already done so at another point this year, please have the media consent form signed by a parent to have on file so that we can take pictures and video clips of our trip and your presentations. If you would prefer not have your picture taken, please write that on the form and we will make sure not to include you in any pictures.

Museum Exhibits

Lamassu (1 & 2)

Region: Ancient Near East

Met Video

Other Met Video on Reliefs

Met Essay Assyrian Sculpture Court

Wikipedia Lamassu

 

 

Babylonian Lion

Region: Ancient Near East

Met Video

Met Essay Babylon

Khan Academy Ishtar Gate

Definitely make sure to situate this piece within the broader context of the Ishtar Gate from which it came.

 

Woman with Basket

Region: Ancient Egypt

Met Video

Met Essay Egypt in the Middle Kingdom

 

 

 

 

 

Magical Necklace

Region: Ancient Egypt

Met Video

Met Essay Egypt in the Middle Kingdom

 

 

 

Kouros Sculpture

Region: Ancient Greece

Met Video

Met Essay Greek Art in the Archaic Period

Met Essay Art of Classical Greece

Be sure to highlight the connections both to the past in Ancient Egypt and to the future in Classical Greece.

 

 

 

Athenian Vases

Region: Ancient Greece

Met Video

Met Essay Athenian Vase Painting

Met Essay Art of Classical Greece

This piece is an example to focus on but I would like you to talk about the pottery in general as well, explaining the technique (red-figure vs black-figure), and discussing some of the themes. There will be plenty of other examples around in the same gallery.

 

Roman Villa Bedroom

Region: Late Republican Rome

Met Video

Met Essay Boscoreale

While this room is not from Pompeii, connections can be made. Among other things, I would like to hear about the type of people who would have lived in a villa like this.

 

 

Orthodox Icons

Region: Byzantine Empire

Met Video

Met Essay Icons and Iconoclasm in Byzantium

In addition to the video, be sure to check out the essay above. While it need not be the primary focus, I would like to hear some mention of the controversy within the Orthodox Church around the debated issue of icons and idolatry.

 

 

Shiva Lord of the Dance

Region: Post-Classical India

Met Video

Met Essay Hinduism and Hindu Art

I would like you to focus primarily on this piece, but you can certainly make observations about some of the surrounding pieces as well to draw general connections. Hopefully there will be some coins to point out. If not, you can still mention it.

 

 

Chinese Buddhist Sculpture

Region: Post-Classical China

Met Video

Additional Met Video

Met Essay Chinese Buddhist Sculpture

Met Essay Buddhism and Buddhist Art

I would like you to focus on this particular sculpture while also making some general observations about the other sculptures in the room. If possible, I’d like you to mention some ways in Chinese buddhist sculpture differs from non-Chinese Buddhist sculpture, as we will be looking briefly at other examples along the way.

 

Chinese Blue and White Porcelain

Region: Ming China

Good example piece but there will be many others around in this gallery, so you can speak specifically and generally.

Point out how it has been imitated by Persian and European artists

We will not immediately go to see these imitative pieces, but you can mention that you will point them out later when we are nearby. Mark them on your map so we can see them briefly when we are close.

 

Japanese Panel Painting

Region: Feudal Japan

Met Video

Further Met Info

Met Essay Art of the Edo Period

Find some cool little observations of your own by looking at the image up close that you can share while presenting.

 

Persian Miniature Painting

Region: Post-Classical Persia/Central Asia

Met Video

Story of Layla and Majnun

Wikipedia on Story of Layla and Majnun

While the focus should not be primarily on the story being depicted, it would be nice to hear a bit about the story to help us see how this image fits.

 

 

Replica Moroccan Court

Region: In the style of Post-Classical Morocco

Met Video (so cool)

Video on Whole Exhibit

Video on Arabic Calligraphy in General

I would like you to point out some of the unique features and explain how it was constructed and how it differs from what the real thing would be like.

 

 

Islamic Mihrab

Region: Post-Classical Iran

Non-Met Video on the Mihrab

Video on Whole Exhibit

Video on Arabic Calligraphy in General

Be sure to identify examples of calligraphy, arabesque, and geometric designs as we discussed in class. Also, make sure you are able to explain what at least some of the calligraphy says.

 

 

Benin Bronze Plaque

Region: Early Modern Africa

BBC video

Video clip on history of Benin Bronzes

Video on debate over African Art

You can see how the art and the culture cannot be disconnected from the history

Met Essay Benin Chronology

 

 

Jade Olmec Face

Region: Ancient Mesoamerica

Met Video

Met Essay Ancient American Jade

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crown of the Andes

Region: Colonial Spanish South America

Met Video

Met Essay Art of the Spanish Americas

Wikipedia on Crown of the Andes

The Met also has a video on Pre-Columbian Gold which points out that the gold objects created by the Spanish would have been made from the melted down remains of Pre-Columbian native gold art. I think it would be cool to bring that up in a room surrounded by many such pieces.

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