FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What are the expectations and requirements for the AP World History Course?

A: AP World History is a college-level history course, and as such, the expectations and requirements are more rigorous than in the standard Regents Global History course. You can find a full description of expectations and requirements in the AP World History Syllabus. Even more detailed information about the course in general can be found under the ABOUT tab at the top of this page.

 

Q: When do students take the AP World History exam, and what does it entail?

A: As AP World History is a two-year course, students sit for the exam during May of their sophomore year. Details of the exam can be found under the ABOUT tab at the top of this page.

 

Q: Oh no! I have a zero for a homework or classwork assignment on PupilPath, but I’m pretty sure I did it and should have received credit. What is going on, and what do I do now?

A: If you believe that you properly submitted an assignment, and then you see on PupilPath that the assignment is marked with a zero, you may assume that I made an error. This is entirely possible. However, there are several possible explanations, so you should go down this list to rule out other possibilities.

ISSUE RESOLUTION
You did not do the assignment. Do the assignment, and turn it in.
You did the assignment, but turned it in late (including excused lateness due to absence). Since I usually input grades about once a week, it may take a few days for the grade change to be reflected on PupilPath, so wait a week, and if it still remains a zero, you should then consider other possibilities.
You submitted the assignment, but it was incomplete. When the assignment is returned to you, it will be marked with “INC” at the top. You should complete the assignment and resubmit it for half credit.
You submitted the assignment, but forgot to write your name. Stop by after school during office hours or at another time I am available to check through the “No Names.”
You completed the assignment, but you forgot to turn it in. Sometimes you think you turned it in but you didn’t. Check your binder and backpack to make sure.
You turned it in and did everything right, but I made a mistake entering the grade on PupilPath. When the assignment is handed back, it should have a Casey stamp indicating that I have already graded it. If you know it was incorrectly marked as zero on PupilPath, simply take the returned assignment and place it back in the “Pensa Pagoda.” Then I can gladly correct the mistake on PupilPath.
You think you didn’t receive credit for the assignment, but you did. Double check PupilPath to make sure the grade hasn’t been entered since the last time you checked, and make sure you are looking at the right assignment.

If your assignment is incorrectly marked as half credit as if it were late, but you were actually absent, make sure that you wrote “ABSENT” on the top of the paper to let me know.

 

Q: Do I have to type my essay? Do I have to print it? Can I just handwrite it? What if I don’t have access to a device to type it?

A: Yes. No. No. If you know in advance, come to me in advance. If it is a sudden issue, let me know as soon as you know, and we can work something out. We are fortunate to have multiple opportunities to access computers at school, so there is almost certainly a way to enable you to type your essay.

 

Q: Do we have homework tonight?

A: Almost certainly yes.

 

Q: What do I do if I don’t know what the homework is? If I don’t see it on PupilPath, does that mean I am excused from doing it?

A: Check PupilPath. If for some reason it isn’t there, check the recent posts on MrCaseyHistory.com. If it isn’t there either, send me an email to pcasey@maspethhighschool.org to inquire about the homework, and do so at a reasonable hour, ideally before 7pm. If I then fail to get back to you at a reasonable hour, you will be excused and given an extra day to do the homework, as I would be at fault. However, you must go through all of the steps, or else you will be responsible for having the homework in on time.

 

Q: Am I ever going to be a Moderator for a debate?

A: Probably, but not definitely. When I make debate groups, the first thing I do is make sure that everyone who has already been a moderator is placed as a debater. Except in rare circumstances, no one will be a moderator twice. However, due to math (which is not my strongest area so I’ll leave it at that), there will sometimes be a few students who never get to be a moderator. So that might end up being you. Them’s the breaks.

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IG: @globalkhan

What did the #Phoenician language sound like? One of my wonderful students asked for more details on the Phoenician language today while discussing the #IndoEuropean and #Bantu migrations. The Phoenicians didn’t call themselves Phoenicians. That’s what the Greeks called them. They were really just the people of Cana’an, the Levantine coast, so they were really called Cana’anites, or Kena’ani in their own language. Their language was a #Semitic language, just like the modern languages #Arabic and #Hebrew, as well as ancient languages of the Middle East like Akkadian and Aramaic. Canaanite/Phoenician has a lot in common with Hebrew, though modern Hebrew has lost some of the Semitic consonants that Arabic still retains, like 3ayn and Qaf. However, ancient Hebrew was extremely similar, so similar that Hebrews and other Cana’anites could probably understand each other easily. Ancient Hebrew was even written with the Phoenician alphabet! It was only later that Hebrew switched to a modified Aramaic alphabet (itself based on Phoenician), which it still uses today. Although Greek adopted their alphabet, their language was totally unrelated, which is why #Greek swapped out the unneeded sounds for some letters with ones they needed. The 3ayn became O, and the lighter of the two Hs became E. . . . #language #languages #languagelover #languagelearning #etymology #historicallinguistics #linguistics #ancienthistory #canaan #lebanon
The evolution of the word for 4 from PIE (Proto-Indo-European) to its many daughter languages. . . . #PIE #PIELanguage #ProtoIndoEuropean #IndoEuropean #Slavic #IndoAryan #IndoIranian #Baltic #Celtic #Germanic #Italic #Anatolian #Hellenic #Linguistics #Archeolinguistics #LingusiticAnthropology #Philology #ILoveLanguage #Language #LanguageLover #Aryan #Aryans #Steppe #SteppeNomads #PewPewPew #PastoralNomads #HorseArchers #Scythians #Tocharians
#YomKippur has begun! Yom Kippur—the Day of Atonement—is considered the most important holiday in the #Jewish faith. Falling in the month of #Tishrei (September or October in the Gregorian calendar), it marks the culmination of the 10 Days of Awe, a period of introspection and repentance that follows #RoshHashanah, the Jewish New Year. According to tradition, it is on Yom Kippur that God decides each person’s fate, so Jews are encouraged to make amends and ask forgiveness for sins committed during the past year. The holiday is observed with a 25-hour fast and a special religious service. Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashanah are known as Judaism’s “High Holy Days.” . . One of the most notable features of these holy days is the blowing of the #Shofar, an ancient musical horn made from the actual horn of an animal. The two shofars in the first picture were from a temporary exhibit at the @metmuseum in 2017. The one on the right is made from a ram’s horn, more typical of #Ashkenazi and #Sephardic Jews, while the one on the left comes from the #Yemenite Jews and is made from the horn of an antelope called the Kudu. . . The shofar is a popular symbol in Jewish imagery found in art. The second image shows “Bowl Fragments with #Menorah, Shofar, and #Torah Ark” dating back to 300–350 CE from the Roman Empire. This piece is on view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 300. From the Met: “This rare example of Jewish gold glass depicts an open Torah ark, with rolled scrolls on its shelves, and ritual implements of the temple-including two menorot (candelabra), a shofar (ram's horn), and an etrog (citron). Originally, a banqueting scene was shown below, with a fish on the tripod table in front of a cushion.” . . The third image shows a Jewish man blowing the shofar in front of the #Kotel, or #WesternWall, the holiest site in #Judaism and the only remnants of the Holy Jerusalem Temple.
An amazing artifact from the @metmuseum that reminds me a lot of the #LansingPapyrus excerpt you guys read where the #AncientEgyptian dad yells at his son to do his #homework. . . This student from ancient Egypt had his many spelling errors marked up in red by the teacher on this writing tablet! #WritingIsHard . . I feel like this is low key an add for @grammarly 😂 ⁣⁣⁣. . . Like slate tablets of centuries past or digital tablets today, wooden boards like this were used for writing notes or school exercises. 📝 Old texts were whitewashed with gesso (essentially a paint primer) to provide a “clean slate” for another, allowing the board to be used over and over again. 👀 This board still bears traces of earlier writing—look closely on the left!⁣ ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣. . 🎨 Writing board, ca. 1981–1802 B.C. Middle Kingdom. Dynasty 12. From Egypt; said to be from Upper Egypt, Thebes or Northern Upper Egypt, Akhmim (Khemmis, Panopolis). Wood, gesso, paint. On view in Gallery 109. @metancient #MasrOmmElDonya #MisrUmmUlDunya #Misr #Masr #ancienthistory #ancientegypt #schoolmemes #schoolbelike
Did WAR lead to Civilization? Idk ask John Green...
A glimpse into the world of #Kush, in the land of #Nubia, along the Upper #Nile. #AfricanHistory #BlackHistory #Meroë #Kushite #Kemet #TaSeti #Sudanic #NiloSaharan
Don’t forget!!!
Don’t let our civilization go down like the Indus Valley. Otherwise, no more WiFi! They couldn’t stop an earthquake. We (hopefully) can stop anthropogenic climate change. Just remember not to cramp your letters on your protest signs, or you’ll make it too easy for people to figure out the directionality of your writing! Gotta give ‘em a challenge na’ mean? #Harappa #MohenjoDaro #IndusValley #Harappan #ClimateChange #SaveTheWiFi #RajeshRao #Dravidian #Harappan
The Chicxulub crater is an impact crater buried underneath the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico. Its center is located near the town of Chicxulub, after which the crater is named. It was formed by a large asteroid or comet about 11 to 81 kilometres (6.8 to 50.3 miles) in diameter, the Chicxulub impactor, striking the Earth. The time of the impact coincides with the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary (K–Pg boundary), slightly less than 66 million years ago, and a widely accepted theory is that worldwide climate disruption from the event was the cause of the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event, a mass extinction in which 75% of plant and animal species on Earth became extinct, including all non-avian dinosaurs. . . #Prehistory #Extinction #Asteroid #Crater #Mexico #Yucatan #BirdsAreDinosaurs

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