Mesopotamia – Crash Course World History

3

September 29, 2015 by mrcaseyhistory

Here’s another great video from John Green on the Land Between the Rivers.

These questions are not homework or anything, but thinking about them while you watch can help you get the most out of the video. 🙂

  1. One of the oldest known works of literature was from Sumer. What was it called?
  2. What was needed to make the Tigris and Euphrates useful for irrigation?
  3. What might be one reason that people in Mesopotamia believed the gods were angry and mean?
  4. What was the original use for Cuneiform writing?
  5. Why did Mesopotamians have to trade?
  6. Who was Hammurabi?
  7. Why might the poorest people in Babylonian society welcome nomadic invaders?
  8. Why are empires hard to unify?
  9. What is a meritocracy?
  10. According to Assyrian beliefs, what would happen if they ever stopped conquering other lands?

3 thoughts on “Mesopotamia – Crash Course World History

  1. Aaron James says:

    So… Gilgamesh is a part of History?

  2. Noah Sanchez says:

    the video is not starting I waited for 10 minutes and it won’t start

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Calendar

September 2015
S M T W T F S
« Jun   Oct »
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

IG: @globalkhan

“The Past is never dead. It’s not even past.” —William Faulkner . #UndeadHistory #HappyHalloween
Cooperation > Conflict . . Image 2 = Council of Clermont Image 3 = Córdoba, Spain Image 4 = Grand Mosque (now Cathedral) of Córdoba Image 5 = Statue of Ibn Rushd, aka Averroës, Spanish Muslim philosopher and scholar of and commentator on Aristotle, his works studied through translation in medieval Christian Europe. . . . #Cordoba #cordobaespaña #alandalus #andalucia #andalusia #españa #spain #spanishhistory
Confío en que mantendréis el secreto de nuestra organización. Espero que trabajareis duro para encontrar la mejor solución para la humanidad. Nuestro pasado, presente y futuro están en vuestros manos.
Helpful map showing the resettlement of Israelites (Northern Kingdom) by the Assyrians and the Jews (Israelites specifically from the Southern Kingdom of Judah) by the Neo-Babylonians (aka Chaldeans). These removals by the two Mesopotamian empires created early disapproval communities of Israelites/Jews, though later in history, additional expulsions from their homeland would lead to an even wider Jewish Diaspora, such as after the Roman destruction of Jerusalem, the Spanish expulsion in 1492, and various other expulsions in Europe and elsewhere over the centuries. And yet, amazingly, the Jewish people continue to retain an independent cultural identity even after thousands of years.
What did the #Phoenician language sound like? One of my wonderful students asked for more details on the Phoenician language today while discussing the #IndoEuropean and #Bantu migrations. The Phoenicians didn’t call themselves Phoenicians. That’s what the Greeks called them. They were really just the people of Cana’an, the Levantine coast, so they were really called Cana’anites, or Kena’ani in their own language. Their language was a #Semitic language, just like the modern languages #Arabic and #Hebrew, as well as ancient languages of the Middle East like Akkadian and Aramaic. Canaanite/Phoenician has a lot in common with Hebrew, though modern Hebrew has lost some of the Semitic consonants that Arabic still retains, like 3ayn and Qaf. However, ancient Hebrew was extremely similar, so similar that Hebrews and other Cana’anites could probably understand each other easily. Ancient Hebrew was even written with the Phoenician alphabet! It was only later that Hebrew switched to a modified Aramaic alphabet (itself based on Phoenician), which it still uses today. Although Greek adopted their alphabet, their language was totally unrelated, which is why #Greek swapped out the unneeded sounds for some letters with ones they needed. The 3ayn became O, and the lighter of the two Hs became E. . . . #language #languages #languagelover #languagelearning #etymology #historicallinguistics #linguistics #ancienthistory #canaan #lebanon
The evolution of the word for 4 from PIE (Proto-Indo-European) to its many daughter languages. . . . #PIE #PIELanguage #ProtoIndoEuropean #IndoEuropean #Slavic #IndoAryan #IndoIranian #Baltic #Celtic #Germanic #Italic #Anatolian #Hellenic #Linguistics #Archeolinguistics #LingusiticAnthropology #Philology #ILoveLanguage #Language #LanguageLover #Aryan #Aryans #Steppe #SteppeNomads #PewPewPew #PastoralNomads #HorseArchers #Scythians #Tocharians
#YomKippur has begun! Yom Kippur—the Day of Atonement—is considered the most important holiday in the #Jewish faith. Falling in the month of #Tishrei (September or October in the Gregorian calendar), it marks the culmination of the 10 Days of Awe, a period of introspection and repentance that follows #RoshHashanah, the Jewish New Year. According to tradition, it is on Yom Kippur that God decides each person’s fate, so Jews are encouraged to make amends and ask forgiveness for sins committed during the past year. The holiday is observed with a 25-hour fast and a special religious service. Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashanah are known as Judaism’s “High Holy Days.” . . One of the most notable features of these holy days is the blowing of the #Shofar, an ancient musical horn made from the actual horn of an animal. The two shofars in the first picture were from a temporary exhibit at the @metmuseum in 2017. The one on the right is made from a ram’s horn, more typical of #Ashkenazi and #Sephardic Jews, while the one on the left comes from the #Yemenite Jews and is made from the horn of an antelope called the Kudu. . . The shofar is a popular symbol in Jewish imagery found in art. The second image shows “Bowl Fragments with #Menorah, Shofar, and #Torah Ark” dating back to 300–350 CE from the Roman Empire. This piece is on view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 300. From the Met: “This rare example of Jewish gold glass depicts an open Torah ark, with rolled scrolls on its shelves, and ritual implements of the temple-including two menorot (candelabra), a shofar (ram's horn), and an etrog (citron). Originally, a banqueting scene was shown below, with a fish on the tripod table in front of a cushion.” . . The third image shows a Jewish man blowing the shofar in front of the #Kotel, or #WesternWall, the holiest site in #Judaism and the only remnants of the Holy Jerusalem Temple.
An amazing artifact from the @metmuseum that reminds me a lot of the #LansingPapyrus excerpt you guys read where the #AncientEgyptian dad yells at his son to do his #homework. . . This student from ancient Egypt had his many spelling errors marked up in red by the teacher on this writing tablet! #WritingIsHard . . I feel like this is low key an add for @grammarly 😂 ⁣⁣⁣. . . Like slate tablets of centuries past or digital tablets today, wooden boards like this were used for writing notes or school exercises. 📝 Old texts were whitewashed with gesso (essentially a paint primer) to provide a “clean slate” for another, allowing the board to be used over and over again. 👀 This board still bears traces of earlier writing—look closely on the left!⁣ ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣. . 🎨 Writing board, ca. 1981–1802 B.C. Middle Kingdom. Dynasty 12. From Egypt; said to be from Upper Egypt, Thebes or Northern Upper Egypt, Akhmim (Khemmis, Panopolis). Wood, gesso, paint. On view in Gallery 109. @metancient #MasrOmmElDonya #MisrUmmUlDunya #Misr #Masr #ancienthistory #ancientegypt #schoolmemes #schoolbelike

Enter your email address to follow MRCASEYHISTORY and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 36 other followers

%d bloggers like this: