Debate

Leave a comment
marketing-debate
Debate Make Up Assignment
Suggested Sources for Research

Class Materials One of the best places to find primary sources, expert commentary, or other helpful information for use in your debates is by looking through materials we have used for classworks and homeworks during the unit of study, especially DBQs. If you have misplaced any of your worksheets or readings, they can be found in the past posts on this site. However, I will NOT give you credit for citing “that handout we got.” You must cite the actual author and title of the original text from which the selection was taken.

Your Textbook As I’ve mentioned many times before, your textbook can be very helpful, especially in the early stages of debate preparation. Although it would not work as your only source, you can certainly cite it during your argument. However, you should make sure to cite it properly with good ethos by referring to the authors and their credentials. As an additional hint, if you find a quote from a primary source inside the textbook, you can cite the source of the quote rather than the textbook, providing an additional source and more ethos!

Another Textbook I’ve found a couple of other textbooks that are available online in PDF form, I especially like the one by Holt. They may give new information your textbook doesn’t cover, and they may include other primary sources that you can use! (If you don’t know what I mean by that, see “Your Textbook.”)

Holt World History Human Legacy (Check the Table of Contents for the authors’ names)

McDougal Littell World History

History.com The History Channel website actually has a number of articles and some fantastic video clips from documentaries on a variety of history topics. Some are just short snippets of text but others go into greater detail, and the documentaries can provide some great expert quotes you can cite. Try the search bar and see what you can find!

SmithsonianMag.com The history section of this online magazine, run by the Smithsonian Institute, has a wide array of articles covering new discoveries or developments in the fields of historical and archeological research. Use general terms in the search bar to see if there is something you could use.

USHistory.org I know what you’re thinking: “Uh, Mister, isn’t this Global?!” Yes, but USHistory.org has a section on Ancient Civilizations that may be helpful to you. It mostly consists of summary articles, but can help you get a general grounding in your topic or cite some basic information if needed.

HistoryWorld.net This site has an alphabetized list of articles on a vast array of topics in history that you may find helpful.

Metropolitan Museum of Art Aside from its vast catalog of all its many pieces, the Met website has a collection of over a thousand essays on various topics from throughout history. While many of them are associated with art, most of them are historical in nature, and serve the purpose of providing historical contexts for art from various times and places.

AramcoWorld While this website is actually owned by an oil company (random), they have a long list of articles on many history topics, especially topics related to history of the Middle East. Selections from this publication have been used a number of times on past Regents exams, and I have also used pieces of their articles in class as part of your lessons. Many articles have well-qualified authors mentioned at the bottom of the article. They are not exclusively about history, so you won’t find everything there, but then again, you might get lucky!

WikiSource Founded by the creaters of Wikipedia, WikiSource is a growing free online library of publicly available (yet sometimes hard to locate) source documents (primary and secondary). If you needed, for example, to find the complete text of The Travels of Marco Polo, they would have it! Remember, you don’t cite WikiSource. You cite whatever source you are reading on the WikiSource website. Get it?

Primary Source Packet I found this last year. It has a selection of primary source documents from throughout Global History. I’ve even used some of these in class! Check the table of contents to see if there’s something that might be of use to you!

Historical Documentaries You all know by now that I have a collection of documentaries on this site. For those who have done extra credit assignments, you have seen that these documentaries always include experts (historians, professors, authors) who offer explanations and opinions about the events discussed. You are welcome to use their statements as evidence in your debates, as long as you mention the expert’s name and qualifications (they usually put it on the screen the first time the person speaks). The documentaries may also give you more ideas for your debates. You are not limited to the videos I have posted, but they are a good place to start.

MrDonn.org This website is great for clarifying some of the topics we discuss and some of the issues you will deal with in debate. I’ve used some things from here with you guys before. This site WILL help you understand your topic better, though it is NOT the best source of Ethos because the articles are not very sophisticated.

HistoryForKids.org They have some very easy to read articles on actually a whole lot of topics. The page is a little confusing, so make sure to look at all parts for what you need, or just use the search tool. Same situation here with Ethos. Get that somewhere else.

Livius.org A more advanced level resource, it has a LOT of historical source excerpts from historians living during or shortly after the events they discuss that can give you great Ethos in your debates and provide unique details to color your discussions. Don’t be intimidated by the high-level language. Just sort through it and you can find gold!

About.com This website has entire sections devoted to Ancient History, Asian History, and other histories, usually with decent authors with at least reasonable expertise. Make sure you click on the author’s name for more information!

Britannica.com If you like using Wikipedia, then try using Encyclopedia Britannica instead. Even though it might have less information than the great and wonderful and easily vandalized Wikipedia, it is a much more respected source, and provides better Ethos.

Wikipedia.com I know what you’re thinking: “WHAT?! Mr. Casey, we can’t use Wikipedia! It’s… bad!” Well, yes and no. I don’t actually want you to use Wikipedia as a source. You definitely can’t do that. HOWEVER, Wikipedia can be very helpful when you need to find sources. If you go to a Wikipedia article related to your topic, very often the article will refer to other sources that you can use. For example, a Wikipedia article might mention, or even quote, a primary source, and that you can definitely use. Just cite the primary source, NOT Wikipedia. If the article has a section called “historiography,” that’s where it will tell you what primary sources to look up. Wikipedia is actually very well sourced, so if you find some information that you want to mention in your debate, click that little number at the end of the sentence, and it will show you where the author got the information from. If you can find that same source online, then you can use it. I hope you got all that.

Debate Sheets

Debaters

Debate Talking Points Debater

Debate Rubric Debater

Moderators

Debate Talking Points Moderator

Debate Rubric Moderator

Debate Make Up Assignment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Calendar

October 2018
S M T W T F S
« Sep    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  
What’s the connection between the #LouisianaPurchase, the #HaitianRevolution, and the expansion of slavery? Swipe to find out! Technically a day late so more of a #YesterdayInHistory 🇭🇹 🇫🇷 🇺🇸 #AtlanticRevolutions
The Epic of #Gilgamesh opening lines sung in ANCIENT #SUMERIAN and played on the Sumerian Long-Neck Gishgudi! Beautifully performed by Peter Pringle. #Mesmerizing #LanguageIsolate #CradleOfCivilization 🥖 🍺
Boy oh boy! These textile factory workers sure did not appreciate the long hours of grueling labor and unsafe working conditions! ✂️ They were churning out those shirts nicely for a while there though! 👕 who needs machines when you have #MechanizedLabor amirite? And to think, until the #Enclosure movement, they started out as simple farmers. 👨🏽‍🌾 👩🏻‍🌾
Yo what the heck?! Look at this! This is what I find on my egg carton 🍳. What kind of world are we living in? LITERALLY! I don’t know if I can buy these eggs anymore 🥚. I like that they’re cage free and they respect the chickens 🐓 , but how can you have so little respect for BASIC GEOGRAPHY?!?!?! 🌎 🌍 #TheWorldIsBackwards #YouGottaBeYolking #AboutToCrack #EggstremelyOffended
The Story of the Guillotine: The Enlightened Killing Machine Check out the full documentary on YouTube!
It really doesn’t feel like 17 years ago. It feels like a million years ago. And it feels like yesterday. The emotions are still strong. It’s still hard for me to think about it, to talk about it. We are still dealing with the effects of it. We must always remember that day and make sure we take the right lessons from it. Here’s to hoping for a better, safer world for everyone in which the power of love, peace, and acceptance can overcome hatred, violence, and intolerance. I hope that you guys can play a role in making that world a reality. 🗽
As we finish our first day #BackToSchool, consider this... On #ThisDayinHistory 1957, the town of Little Rock becomes a idealogical battleground. Under orders from the governor of Arkansas, armed National Guardsmen prevent nine African-American students from attending the all-white Central High School in Little Rock. Hazel Bryan was just 15 when this photo was taken, as was Elizabeth Eckford, the girl Bryan was screaming at. It was the first day of school in Little Rock, Arkansas. In 1957, a Federal District Court ordered the all-white Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, to allow African-American students to attend. Governor Orval Faubus declared that he would not follow the decree. When nine African-American students attempted to enter the school on September 4, 1957, a crowd of several hundred angry and belligerent whites confronted them. Hundreds of National Guardsmen, called up by Faubus, blocked the students’ entry into the school. Faubus’s action won him acclaim from many but it was a serious embarrassment to the Eisenhower administratiuon. Eisenhower tried to negotiate a settlement with Faubus, but when this failed, he sent in federal troops. The nine African-American students were finally allowed to attend Central High. #CivilRights #BacktoSchool #USHistory

Enter your email address to follow MRCASEYHISTORY and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 35 other followers

%d bloggers like this: